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Paul Westerberg wasn't precious about his craft ("I hate music/It's got too many notes," he sang on the first Replacements album in 1981).

But he become the American punk-rock poet laureate of the Eighties, reeling off shabbily rousing underdog anthems like "I Will Dare" and "Bastards of Young," as well as beautifully afflicted songs like "Swinging Party" and "Here Comes a Regular." A high-school dropout, Westerberg spoke for a nation of smart, wiseacre misfits, paving the way for Green Day and Nirvana, both of which were led by avowed Replacements fans.

America first discovered the Bee Gees with the 1977 disco soundtrack Saturday Night Fever.

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"You write a song about something that you think might be taboo, you sing it for other people and they immediately recognize themselves in it," Prine says. You admit everything that's wrong and you talk about it in the sharpest terms, in the keenest way you can." "Back then, I just wanted to write songs I could be proud of and be able to play in five years," Billie Joe Armstrong said last year of his attitude while creating Green Day's 1994 pop-punk breakthrough Dookie.

Because he's got you looking both ways, it's bigger, it hits harder.

Or softer, depending on how you look at it." Westerberg has his own explanation for his unique underdog genius: "I think the opposite when I see something," he once said.

Besides their own hits (including a string of six consecutive Number Ones), the brothers wrote the title song for Grease, Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton's "Islands in the Stream," Barbra Streisand's "Guilty," and Destiny's Child's "Emotion." "We see ourselves first and foremost as composers, writing for ourselves and other people," Robin Gibb said.

Maybe it's his family's blue-collar background or the years he spent delivering mail before becoming a full-time musician.

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